Guiding Principles

Consensus-based principles that shape how the Task Force and its
members strive to achieve value

ShakingHands_Icon

Collaboration

The Health Care Transformation Task Force believes it is a national priority for the healthcare industry to collaborate in the transition to value.

Growth in total health costs, both public and private, should ideally be at or below the overall rate of GDP growth.

All payers—public and private—should use the full extent of their capabilities and authority, including that provided to the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services, to make successful models national policy.

Meaningful competition should expand and not contract during this transition. Market participants should be equipped with the information and tools they need to compete fairly.

Alignment among public and private payers is critical. Common accountability targets, metrics, and incentives across payers are necessary for expedited transformation, and will allow for meaningful comparability and true best practice identification.

Broad-scale adoption of value-based models among providers and payers is critical to support the transition away from fee-for-service to achieve a truly person-centered system of care.

Data is essential to driving the success of care coordination and should be provided at a sufficiently granular level by those private and public entities currently holding it, allowing for standardized and ad hoc reporting by care coordinating entities.

SuccessfulSystems_Icon

Elements of Successful Systems

The Health Care Transformation Task Force believes value-based payment and delivery systems should demonstrate the following elements.

Incentivize and hold payers and providers accountable for the total cost, patient experience, and quality of care for a population of patients – either across an entire population over the course of a year or during a defined episode that spans multiple sites of care – while providing adequate support and education to facilitate success.

Provide for person-centered, coordinated care models with robust primary care capabilities at the core that meet the needs of particular patient populations, including strengthening the safety net for disadvantaged populations.

Promote transparency of quality and cost metrics in a manner that is accessible to, and easily understood by, consumers.

Balance financial incentives appropriately over all phases, given the fact that a full transition to a sustainable value-based system will take years.

Encourage individual and caregiver participation and engagement at all levels of system transformation from point of care to redesign of care delivery, including governance and oversight.

Share savings achieved through alternate payment models among people, payers/purchasers, and providers to ensure adequate investment in new care models.

Ensure that providers can recoup reasonable returns on investments in care coordination by calibrating performance standards to draw in as many players as possible early on, and raising the bar gradually, yet consistently, over time.

OurCommitment_Icon

Our Commitment

Health Care Transformation Task Force Members commit to advancing the above Guiding Principles as follows

We commit to have 75 percent of our respective businesses operating under value-based payment arrangements that focus on lowering cost and improving the quality of care to produce better population health by January 2020.

We commit to engage multiple perspectives to build consensus – including patients, purchasers, providers, and payers – and to not promote the interests of one group over another.

We commit to externally informing and promoting an industry-wide call to action on the transition to value.

We commit to sharing qualitative and quantitative data (as available and appropriate) to facilitate a shared understanding of the broader impact of value transformation.

We commit to have 75 percent of our respective businesses operating under value-based payment arrangements that focus on lowering cost and improving the quality of care to produce better population health by January 2020.

We commit to engage multiple perspectives to build consensus – including patients, purchasers, providers, and payers – and to not promote the interests of one group over another.

We commit to externally informing and promoting an industry-wide call to action on the transition to value.

We commit to sharing qualitative and quantitative data (as available and appropriate) to facilitate a shared understanding of the broader impact of value transformation.